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HomeLatestNewsGlasgow 2023 - Day 6 - Report

Glasgow 2023 – Day 6 – Report

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Men

Jeffrey Hooglands qualified first

Kilometre Time Trial

The Men’s Kilo started with the ironically named King of the Mountain – Roy van den Berg of the Netherlands. He just failed to break the one minute barrier – these days almost guaranteed to be the cut-off for qualification for the finals. 1:00.530 might not seem far off, but there would be five riders quicker than the Dutchman who still did go under 60 seconds, such are the margins in this competition.

The first to break the barrier was Joe Truman of Great Britain with a 59.507 giving him a lead that lasted only two heats before Matt Glaetzer of Australia topped it with a 58.572. Fellow countrymen Tom Cornish slipped into second with a 58.798 and Germany’s Max Dornbach took over in third in the penultimate heat with a 59.391. That left just Alejandro Martinez of Spain and Jeffrey Hoogland of the Netherlands. Martinez would scrape into the last finals berth – the only rider to do so and fail to break the magic minute mark – with a 1:00.183. Hoogland was on another level, though – 57.791 – six tenths faster than Glaetzer in second.

The challenge in the Finals is to back up your ride from the morning session and the first few riders struggled. Martinez was only a hundredth off his earlier time, but Matteo Bianchi of Italy and Patrick Rajkowski of Poland both slipped below he minute mark but maintained their 6th and 7th fastest time. Dornbach dropped a place – despite improving to 59.245 – because Truman found almost half a second to finish on 59.092 – just outside the medals. They were awarded to the top three from Qualfying. Cornish was a fraction slower than the morning session – 0.024 down – and Glaetzer a fair bit quicker – 0.046 up. That, combined with Hoogland losing a huge chunk of time – 0.551 seconds – was enough to reduce the gap between the top two to four thousandths of a second. But it wasn’t quite enough to deny Hoogland the Gold.

The World Record remains at 56.303, set by Francois Pervis at Aquascalientes in Mexico ten years ago. Hoogland plans to attempt to break that at the same venue in late October and on this form, few would bet against him. 55 seconds, anybody?

Mathew Glaetzer

Finals
GOLD
HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED 58.522
SILVER GLAETZER Matthew AUS 58.526
BRONZE CORNISH Thomas AUS 58.822

4 TRUMAN Joseph GBR 59.092
5 DORNBACH Maximilian GER 59.245
6 RAJKOWSKI Patryk POL 1:00.096
7 BIANCHI Matteo ITA 1:00.099
8 MARTINEZ CHORRO Alejandro ESP 1:00.192

Jeffrey Hoogland

Qualifying
1 HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED 57.971
2 GLAETZER Matthew AUS 58.572
3 CORNISH Thomas AUS 58.798
4 DORNBACH Maximilian GER 59.391
5 TRUMAN Joseph GBR 59.507
6 RAJKOWSKI Patryk POL 59.889
7 BIANCHI Matteo ITA 59.911
8 MARTINEZ CHORRO Alejandro ESP 1:00.183

9 RAMIREZ MORALES Santiago COL 1:00.199
10 XUE Chenxi CHN 1:00.310
11 RUIZ TERAN Juan MEX 1:00.357
12 LANDERNEAU Melvin FRA 1:00.495
13 van den BERG Roy NED 1:00.530
14 ORTEGA FONTALVO Cristian David COL 1:00.539
15 WEINRICH Willy Leonhard GER 1:00.729
16 DODYK Ryan CAN 1:00.775
17 KERGOZOU de la BOESSIERE Nicholas NZL 1:00.821
18 MOHD ZONIS Muhammad Fadhil MAS 1:01.409
19 HYTYCH Matěj CZE 1:01.626
20 VERDUGO OSUNA Edgar MEX 1:01.823
21 MORENO SANCHEZ Jose ESP 1:01.950
22 MYBURGH Johannes RSA 1:03.287
23 CHUGAY Andrey KAZ 1:04.185
24 LAITONJAM Ronaldo IND 1:04.418
25 HASSAN Hussein EGY 1:06.755

Keirin

Several of the riders who had just done two Kilo efforts then lined up for the first round of the Keirin – but it didn’t seem to have affected any of them too badly. Not that there wasn’t a surprise or two.

Jack Carlin of Great Britain and Shinji Nakano of Japan qualified from Heat 1 but Israel’s Mikhail Yakovlev, Muhammad Ridwan Sahrom of Malaysia and, more significantly, Harrie Lareysen of the Netherlands were dumped into the Repechages.

The Sprint competition seemed to have done more damage than the Kilo, with Nicholas Paul of Trinidad & Tobago, Matthew Richardson of Australia and Jai Angsuthasawit of Thailand all missing out in heat two – Keving Quintero of Colombia and Kaiya Ota of Japan qualifying for the Quarter Finals.

It was a similar story with Sebastien Vigier of France and Sam Dakin of New Zealand who missed out from heat three – along with Sergey Ponomaryov of Kazakhstan and Esow of India. Not so for Azizul Awang of Malaysia or Hamish Turnbull of Great Britain, who went straight through.

Max Dornbach of Germany suggested that two Kilos is actually a pretty good warm up, following Jair Tjon En Fa of Suriname (who put in the most impressive ride of the round) to a day’s rest before the Quarter Finals. Kwesi Browne of Trinidad and Tobago, Santiago Ramirez of Colombia, Tom Cornish of Australia and Tijmen van Loon of the Netherlands would have to ride again – Cornish on the back of two Kilos – but at least he already had a medal in his pocket from the Kilo.

So, too, did Matt Glaetzer of Australia and Jeffrey Hoogland of the Netherlands, but they managed to avoid another ride behind the derny – taking first and second in the final heat. Muhammad Shah Firdus Sahrom of Malaysia, Marc Jurczyk of Germany, James Hedgcock of Canada and Jean Spies of South Africa would be up on the track again.

If there were a few surprises in the First Round, most were resolved in the Repechages – Lavreysen, Dakin, Richardson, Yakovlev, Cornish and Vigier all progressed – along with Jurczyk and van Loon. The only names from the initial start sheets that you might have expected to see on tomorrow’s Quarer Finals list were Angsuthasawit and, particularly, Paul.

Repechages

Heat 1
1 LAVREYSEN Harrie NED Q
2 DAKIN Sam NZL +0.340 Q

3 SPIES Jean RSA +0.377
4 RAMIREZ MORALES Santiago COL +24.054

Heat 2
1 RICHARDSON Matthew AUS Q
2 JURCZYK Marc GER +0.140 Q

3 ANGSUTHASAWIT Jai THA +0.240
4 HEDGCOCK James CAN +1.533

Heat 3
1 YAKOVLEV Mikhail ISR Q
2 CORNISH Thomas AUS +0.388 Q

3 BROWNE Kwesi TTO +0.506
3 SAHROM Muhammad Ridwan MAS +0.522
5 ESOW Esow IND +0.685

Heat 4
1 VIGIER Sebastien FRA Q
2 van LOON Tijmen NED +0.051 Q

3 SAHROM Muhammad Shah Firdaus MAS +0.123
4 PAUL Nicholas TTO +0.123
5 PONOMARYOV Sergey KAZ +0.298

First Round

Heat 1
1 CARLIN Jack GBR Q
2 NAKANO Shinji JPN +0.033 Q

3 LAVREYSEN Harrie NED +0.037
4 SAHROM Muhammad Ridwan MAS +0.203
5 YAKOVLEV Mikhail ISR +0.254

Heat 2
1 QUINTERO CHAVARRO Kevin Santiago COL Q
2 OTA Kaiya JPN +0.066 Q

3 ANGSUTHASAWIT Jai THA +0.124
4 RICHARDSON Matthew AUS +0.192
5 PAUL Nicholas TTO +0.314

Heat 3
1 AWANG Mohd Azizulhasni MAS Q
2 TURNBULL Hamish GBR +0.222 Q

3 PONOMARYOV Sergey KAZ +0.299
4 DAKIN Sam NZL +0.373
5 VIGIER Sebastien FRA +0.412
6 ESOW Esow IND +0.624

Heat 4
1 TJON EN FA Jair SUR Q
2 DORNBACH Maximilian GER +0.158 Q

3 BROWNE Kwesi TTO +0.205
4 RAMIREZ MORALES Santiago COL +0.302

5 CORNISH Thomas AUS +0.663
6 van LOON Tijmen NED +0.804

Heat 5
1 GLAETZER Matthew AUS Q
2 HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED +0.028 Q

3 SAHROM Muhammad Shah Firdaus MAS +0.114
4 JURCZYK Marc GER +0.529
5 HEDGCOCK James CAN +0.554
6 SPIES Jean RSA +0.699

Madison

Like the Women’s race the previous day, the Men’s Madison was all about the Sprints – with no team gaining a lap (although the Dutch came very close).

Belgium were the early leaders – Lindsay de Vylder and Robbe Ghys taking the opening two sprints to build a lead they would hold until sprint 16 of 20 when they would finally be overhauled by Yoeri Havik and Jan Willem van Schip of the Netherlands. At that stage it was only a one point deficit – though they were tied on points with Lasse Leth and Michael Morkov of Denmark with Aaron Gate of New Zealand six points back and the Great Britain duo of Ollie Wood and Mark Stewart a further three points adrift.

That Dutch lead had come courtesy of a long, if ultimately ill-fated attempt to take a lap, but it did see them take three sprints in a row, which was almost as good. On the run-in to the final sprint it was very close with the Dutch still ahead on 33, Belgium in the Silver medal position on 30, Great Britain in second with 29 points thanks to a run of four consecutive sprint scores, including a win and two second places – and the Kiwis a little further back in fourth on 24. And the Dutch looked to be spent.

Until it mattered. Then they flew around the bunch with two to go, triggering the final rush for medals. On paper, the Kiwis would still take Gold if they won and the Dutch failed to score. And Great Britain would pull on the rainbow jersey if they took the final 10 points, provided the Dutch finished third (where they would be tied on points and GB would win by virtue of their finishing position or lower). And Belgium just need to finish in the top three and ahead of the Dutch.

And the final points were divided between those four teams. The Kiwis did what they had to do to have any chance of winning and took all 10 points, moving them to 34. Great Britain took second – moving them to 35. If Belgium could pip the Dutch to third, they’d go to 34 and the Dutch to 35. Great Britain would take the Gold and the Belgians would miss out on the medals, on the same points as New Zealand ahead of them. That would have lifted the roof of the velodrome.

It wasn’t to be – after all their early domination, the Belgians came home fourth on the line and dropped to fourth overall. The Kiwis had snatched the Bronze. But the four points to the Dutch for third meant that they were Madison World Champions again and Wood and Stewart would have to settle for Silver. What a race!

Netherlands

GOLD Netherlands NED (van SCHIP Jan Willem, HAVIK Yoeri) 37
SILVER Great Britain GBR (WOOD Oliver, STEWART Mark) 35
BRONZE New Zealand NZL (GATE Aaron STEWART, Campbell) 34

4 Belgium BEL (de VYLDER Lindsay, GHYS Robbe) 32
5 Denmark DEN (LETH Lasse, MORKOV Michael)  28
6 France FRA (THOMAS Benjamin, BOUDAT Thomas) 16
7 Germany GER (KLUGE Roger, REINHARDT Theo) 14
8 Spain ESP (MORA VEDRI Sebastian, TORRES BARCELO Albert)  14
9 Italy ITA (VIVIANI Elia, SCARTEZZINI Michele) 9
10 Portugal POR (ALVES OLIVEIRA Rui Filipe, ALVES OLIVEIRA Ivo Manuel)  8
11 Austria AUT (RITZINGER Felix, SCHMIDBAUER Maximilian)
12 Japan JPN (IMAMURA Shunsuke, KUBOKI Kazushige) -37
DNF Poland POL (BANASZEK Alan, SAJNOK Szymon)
DNF Czechia CZE (RUGOVAC Denis, VONEŠ Jan)
DNF Switzerland SUI (IMHOF Claudio, RUEGG Lukas)
DNF Hong Kong, China HKG (LEUNG Chun Wing, LEUNG Ka Yu)
DNF United States USA (HOOVER Gavin, LANGE Colby)
DNF Canada CAN (BIBIC Dylan,  GUILLEMETTE Mathias)

Women

Ellesse Andrews vs Sophie Capewell

Sprint

The middle day of the three day Women’s Sprint Competition saw everyone progress through the 1/8 Finals as they’d qualified, with the exception of Ellesse Andrews of New Zealand who overcame Pauline Sophie Grabosch of Germany, who’d qualified three places and 0.066 seconds quicker.

Two of the Quarter Finals went to form and were decided in two straight races with Emma Finucane of Great Britain seeing off Lauriane Genest of Canada, Lea Sophie Friedrich of Germany knocking out reigning World Champion Mathilde Gros with relative ease. Friedrich’s team mate Emma Hinze overcame Liying Yuan of China in two, too – despite qualifying one place below her. To be fair, the time difference between them over 200m was 0.026 seconds.

Not so in the other heat. Sophie Capewell of Great Britain qualified second, beating her own National Record with a 10.309 (although Finucane went faster still). She was 8 places and 0.356 seconds faster than Andrews and, in the first race, she looked it – she was 0.330 seconds ahead at the line. This was going to be a formality, surely?

Nobody had told Andrews – who won the Keirin title a couple of nights ago. She edged her rival out by 0.016 seconds – just over a wheel rim on the photo – to set up a decider. And in the third race she got the jump on the Brit and rolled home half a second clear.

Finucane and Hinze will contest the first Semi Final on the final day of competition and Andrews and Friedrich the second.  

Lauriane Genest vs Emma Finucane

Quarter Finals
1 FINUCANE Emma GBR **
2 GENEST Lauriane CAN +0.174 +0.115

1 ANDREWS Ellesse NZL +0.330 **
2 CAPEWELL Sophie GBR * +0.014 +0.536

1 FRIEDRICH Lea Sophie GER **
2 GROS Mathilde FRA +0.237 +0.115

1 HINZE Emma GER **
2 YUAN Liying CHN +0.105 +0.130

Ellesse Andrews vs Pauline Sophie Grabosch

1/8 Finals
1 FINUCANE Emma GBR *
2 SATO Mina JPN +0.178

1 CAPEWELL Sophie GBR *
2 KOUAME Taky Marie Divine FRA +0.285

1 FRIEDRICH Lea Sophie GER *
2 BAYONA PINEDA Martha COL +0.058

1 YUAN Liying CHN *
2 CLONAN Kristina AUS +0.026

1 HINZE Emma GER *
2 van der WOUW Hetty NED +0.355

1 GROS Mathilde FRA *
2 MITCHELL Kelsey CAN +0.007

1 ANDREWS Ellesse NZL *
2 GRABOSCH Pauline Sophie GER +0.218

1 GENEST Lauriane CAN *
2 GUO Yufang CHN +0.017

Points Race

Lotte Kopecky celbrates

The Women’s Points Race was a cracking warm up for the Men’s Madison, but it was almost as one sided as the later race was close. Still, as a demonstration of how to control and ultimately win a Points Race, it was as good as it gets.

Reigning Champion Lotte Kopecky of Belgium only scored in five of the 10 sprints – and only won two (she was second in the other three), but she scored early – second in sprint one and first in sprint two – and then snuffed out any attack that threatened her lead.

The only attack that stuck was her own – working with Georgia Baker of Australia to take a lap, during the course of which the Australian picked up her only sprint win and almost half of the 11 points she’d take from the sprints.

That left the two well clear of the field and Kopecky with and eight point lead she wasn’t going to relinquish. En route to the final gallop, the leaders were on 39 and 31 points – and the Bronze medal position was occupied by Neah Evans of Great Britain on 9 points. With the exception of the five riders on negative points and the one non-finisher, Bronze was, mathematically, available to anyone, if they could take the 10 points for the final sprint.

In practice, the field was split in two and the challenge would have to come from the front group; Evans was in the second. Tsuyaka Uchino of Japan was on four points as she lead the charge over the line – she moved to 14. Yareli Acevedo of Mexico came home second, but the six points wouldn’t even wipe out her negative score – she moved to -4. Lilly Williams of the USA was third, but that only took her to 9 points, moving her ahead of Evans – and the final two points went to Daniela Campos of Portugal, leaving her on 5 and Uchino with a Bronze medal.

Baker and Kopecky

GOLD KOPECKY Lotte BEL 39 Pts
SILVER BAKER Georgia AUS 31
BRONZE UCHINO Tsuyaka JPN 14

4 WILLIAMS Lily USA 9
5 EVANS Neah GBR 9
6 RAAIJMAKERS Marit NED 8
7 ZANARDI Silvia ITA 8
8 CAMPOS Daniela POR 5
9 TEUTENBERG Lea Lin GER 4
10 MACHAČOVA Jarmila CZE 3
11 DRUMMOND Michaela NZL 3
12 BONHOMME Ariane CAN 2
13 LIU Jiali CHN 2
14 KOZIEVA Nafosat UZB 1
15 KARASIEWICZ Karolina POL
16 ACEVEDO MENDOZA Yareli MEX -4
17 le NET Marie FRA -14
18 ISASI CRISTOBAL Ziortza ESP -19
19 EBERHARDT Verena AUT -20
20 ANDRES Michelle SUI -20
21 LEUNG Bo Yee HKG -40
DNF CAUCHOIS ONE Fanny Malissa LAO

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