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Roubaix 2021 – Day 4 – Report

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2021 Tissot UCI Track Cycling World Championships - Roubaix, France

Men’s Omnium

Photo Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

As with the Women’s Omnium the day before, qualifying heats were required to whittle the 27 entrants to the track limit of 24. Unlike the women’s event, there were no real shocks in terms of the riders who were eliminated – although Roman Gladysh of Ukraine was something a surprise; the 2018 European Scratch Champion would usually be expected to be competitive.

As an indication of where the form was, Great Britain’s Ethan Hayter and Italy’s Elia Viviani both won their heats, but neither of them by a country mile.

Qualifying

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Heat 1
1 HAYTER Ethan GBR 26
2 LEITAO Iuri POR 25
3 van den BOSSCHE Fabio BEL 23
4 FILUTAS Viktor HUN 14
5 O’BRIEN Kelland AUS 13
6 HASHIMOTO Eiya JPN 10
7 GEE Derek CAN 10
8 PENA SALAS Ricardo MEX 8
9 ARANGO CARVAJAL J. E. COL 8
10 TEUTENBERG Tim Torn GER 6
11 EEFTING Roy NED 6
12 CRISTA Daniel ROU 5

13 CHALEL Yacine ALG 3
14 GLADYSH Roman UKR -18

Heat 2
1 VIVIANI Elia ITA 15
2 MARTORELL HAGA Erik ESP 14
3 RUGOVAC Denis CZE 14
4 KARALIOK Yauheni BLR 12
5 GATE Aaron NZL 9
6 BANASZEK Alan POL 8
7 SYRITSA Gleb RCF 8
8 GRONDIN Donavan FRA 5
9 CAMPBELL Akil TTO 5
10 HOOVER Gavin USA 4
11 VOGEL Alex SUI 4
12 MALMBERG Matias DEN 1

13 SIM Teck Kwang Calvin SIN DNF

I – Scratch Race

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Both mean confirmed that form in the Scratch Race, with Hayter leading out the field in the closing stages and taking the win from newly crowned Scratch Race World Champion Donovan Grondin of France – with Viviani taking third. Iuri Leitao of Portugal and 2013 Omnium World Champion Aaron Gate of New Zealand also looking competitive.

1 HAYTER Ethan GBR
2 GRONDIN Donavan FRA
3 VIVIANI Elia ITA
4 LEITAO Iuri POR
5 GATE Aaron NZL
6 MALMBERG Matias DEN
7 HASHIMOTO Eiya JPN
8 GEE Derek CAN
9 VOGEL Alex SUI
10 MARTORELL HAGA Erik ESP
11 van den BOSSCHE Fabio BEL
12 EEFTING Roy NED
13 KARALIOK Yauheni BLR
14 ARANGO CARVAJAL J. E. COL
15 RUGOVAC Denis CZE
16 BANASZEK Alan POL
17 HOOVER Gavin USA
18 O’BRIEN Kelland AUS
19 SYRITSA Gleb RCF
20 TEUTENBERG Tim Torn GER
21 FILUTAS Viktor HUN -1 lap
22 CRISTA Daniel ROU -1
23 PENA SALAS Ricardo MEX -1
24 CAMPBELL Akil TTO -2

II – Tempo Race

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

The early stages of the Tempo Race looked like the kind of ‘Devil-in-Reverse’ the UCI always thought it would be – and then Hayter and Leitao took a lap – mopping up the points for 12 of the 40 laps between them. Gate only took a single sprint, bit did take a lap to claim third. Viviani finished down in 8th.

1 HAYTER Ethan GBR 28
2 LEITAO Iuri POR 24
3 GATE Aaron NZL 21
4 MARTORELL HAGA Erik ESP 4
5 O’BRIEN Kelland AUS 3
6 GEE Derek CAN 2
7 MALMBERG Matias DEN 1
8 VIVIANI Elia ITA
9 KARALIOK Yauheni BLR
10 BANASZEK Alan POL
11 van den BOSSCHE Fabio BEL
12 HASHIMOTO Eiya JPN
13 FILUTAS Viktor HUN -10
14 GRONDIN Donavan FRA -18
15 VOGEL Alex SUI -19
16 PENA SALAS Ricardo MEX -20
17 RUGOVAC Denis CZE -20
18 ARANGO CARVAJAL J. E. COL -20
19 CAMPBELL Akil TTO -20
20 HOOVER Gavin USA -20
21 EEFTING Roy NED -20

TEUTENBERG Tim Torn GER DNS
SYRITSA Gleb RCF DNS
CRISTA Daniel ROU DNS

III – Elimination Race

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

The Elimination Race had a few unusual moments. Viviani and Leitao were both out surprisingly early, given their form in the earlier races and then Hayter – who had controlled the race from the front up to that point – sat up to take fourth place.

That was strange, but the moment where Grondin set up and celebrated his win at the bell was stranger still. To be fair to him, Matias Malmberg of Denmark sat up very early, so his elimination was uncontested and he got out of synch mentally. Gate, fortunately, did know what was happening and accepted the gift gladly.

1 GATE Aaron NZL
2 GRONDIN Donavan FRA
3 MALMBERG Matias DEN
4 HAYTER Ethan GBR
5 HASHIMOTO Eiya JPN
6 MARTORELL HAGA Erik ESP
7 HOOVER Gavin USA
8 LEITAO Iuri POR
9 VIVIANI Elia ITA
10 CAMPBELL Akil TTO
11 KARALIOK Yauheni BLR
12 VOGEL Alex SUI
13 BANASZEK Alan POL
14 EEFTING Roy NED
15 O’BRIEN Kelland AUS
16 GEE Derek CAN
17 van den BOSSCHE Fabio BEL
18 RUGOVAC Denis CZE
19 PENA SALAS Ricardo MEX
20 ARANGO CARVAJAL J. E. COL
21 FILUTAS Viktor HUN

IV – Points Race

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Unlike Archibald in the Women’s event, Hayter only had a six point advantage going in to the Points Race. It didn’t matter. The Great Britain rider scored a single point in the first sprint and then took the next four in a row. He took the penultimate sprint as well – en route to a late lap gain (his second) – but the rainbow jersey was won long before that.

The battle behind him was closer. Although Gate saw his chances of winning slip away early on, he did score in six of the first eight sprints – four second places and two thirds – to keep a small buffer to Laitao. In the background, though, Viviani was closing in. A lap gain and 5 points took him to within six points of Leitao, but back in fifth place. A blistering attack with two laps to go secured the 10 points on the line and, with neither Leitao nor Martorell in fourth scoring, the Bronze medal was his.

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

GOLD HAYTER Ethan GBR 114
SILVER GATE Aaron NZL 108
BRONZE VIVIANI Elia ITA 86

4 LEITAO Iuri POR 98
5 MARTORELL HAGA Erik ESP 86
6 MALMBERG Matias DEN 94
7 GRONDIN Donavan FRA 90
8 van den BOSSCHE Fabio BEL 48
9 29 HASHIMOTO Eiya JPN 78
10 10 GEE Derek CAN 66
11 41 BANASZEK Alan POL 48
12 8 KARALIOK Yauheni BLR 60
13 2 O’BRIEN Kelland AUS 50
14 55 HOOVER Gavin USA 38
15 302 VOGEL Alex SUI 54
16 36 EEFTING Roy NED 33
17 26 FILUTAS Viktor HUN 18
18 12 ARANGO CARVAJAL J. E. COL 22
19 34 PENA SALAS Ricardo MEX 15
RUGOVAC Denis CZE DNF
CAMPBELL Akil TTO DNF
TEUTENBERG Tim Torn GER DNF
SYRITSA Gleb RCF DNF
CRISTA Daniel ROU DNF

Women’s 500m Time Trial

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Defending Champion Lea Sophie Friedrich of Germany had a relatively poor opening lap and found herself at the end of the season sandwiched between the Russian duo of Daria Shmeleva – 11 thousandths back – and Anastasiia Voinova 17 hundredths ahead.

Behind her, Miriam Vece of Italy – Bronze medallist a year ago was only another five thousandths back and Pauline Sophie Grabosch of Germany 16 hundredths further back. Less than half a second separated the top seven.

Qualifying

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

1 VOINOVA Anastasiia RCF 33.183
2 FRIEDRICH Lea Sophie GER 33.358
3 SHMELEVA Daria RCF 33.369
4 VECE Miriam ITA 33.374
5 GRABOSCH Pauline Sophie GER 33.438
6 BAYONA PINEDA Martha COL 33.552
7 TYSHCHENKO Yana RCF 33.660
8 PROEPSTER Alessa-Catriona GER 34.674

9 KARWACKA Marlena POL 34.832
10 CASAS ROIGE Helena ESP 35.337
11 BILETSKA Alla UKR 35.575
12 JABORNIKOVA Veronika CZE 35.662
13 SALAZAR SANCHEZ Marianis COL 36.290
14 UKPESERAYE Ese NGR 38.779

Finals

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

In yesterday’s Kilometre Time Trial there was little change from Qualfying to the Finals; the 500 was very different. Martha Bayona of Colombia was up by six thousandths, but that wasn’t enough to save her 6th place – Yana Tsyhchenko of Russia was up by three tenths. Grabosch, too, improved by over a quarter of a second and leap-frogged Miriam Vece, who was down seven hundredths, to take 4th.

The most significant change, though, was from the defending champion, who found three tenths to jump ahead of Voinova, who had also improved fractionally, to retake the total.

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

GOLD Lea Sophie Friedrich GER 33.057
SILVER VOINOVA Anastasiia RCF 33.163
BRONZE SHMELEVA Daria RCF 33.164

4 GRABOSCH Pauline Sophie GER 33.177
5 VECE Miriam 33.300
6 TYSHCHENKO Yana RCF 33.337
7 BAYONA PINEDA Martha COL 33.546
8 PROEPSTER Alessa-Catriona GER 34.814

Women’s Madison

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

The first heat of the Madison qualifiers contained most of the fancied nations – and the racing wouldn’t have been out of place in a final. Up front, the Netherlands and Great Britain – along with Poland and Italy – made a real fight of it. With just the final sprint to go, Ukraine and Belarus were out, with no points scored. Ukraine won the sprint and leapt up to 4th – and Belarus took third and moved up to 7th. The USA and Ireland were out.

Heat 2 was more straightforward, particularly after Mexico lost a lap and then pulled out. With only one team to be eliminated, the rest of the squads could practice their handslings without the pressure.

Qualifying

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Heat 1
1 Netherlands NED (PIETERS Amy, WILD Kirsten) 19
2 Poland POL (PIKULIK Daria, PIKULIK Wiktoria) 12
3 Great Britain GBR (ARCHIBALD Katie, EVANS Neah) 12
4 Ukraine UKR (FEDOTOVA Kseniia, KLIMCHENKO Tetyana) 10
5 Italy ITA (PATERNOSTER Letizia, BARBIERI Rachele) 8 Black
6 New Zealand NZL (WOLLASTON Ally,DRUMMOND Michaela) 5
7 Belarus BLR (TSERAKH Hanna, KIPTSIKAVA Nastassia) 4
8 Spain ESP  (LARRARTE ARTEAGA Eukene, ISASI CRISTOBAL Ziortza) 3

9 United States USA (RYAN Kendall, WILLIAMS Lily) 2
10 Ireland IRL (KAY Emily, SHARPE Alice) 2

Heat 2
1 Australia AUS (BAKER Georgia, MANLY Alexandra) 27
2 France FRA (COPPONI Clara, le NET Marie) 26
3 Russian Cycling Federation RCF (NOVOLODSKAIA Mariia, MILIAEVA Mariia) 15
4 Denmark DEN (DIDERIKSEN Amalie, LETH Julie) 10
5 Belgium BEL (BOSSUYT Shari, de CLERCQ Katrijn) 8
6 Germany GER  (TEUTENBERG Lea Lin, REISSNER Lena Charlotte) 7
7 Switzerland (ANDRES Michelle, METTRAUX Lena) SUI 4
8 Czech Republic (SEVCIKOVA Petra, MACHACOVA Jarmila) CZE

9 Mexico MEX (VELASCO FUENTES Victoria, ACEVEDO MENDOZA Yareli) DNF

Final

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

The Final wasn’t entirely one-sided, but Amy Pieters and Kirsten Wild of the Netherlands were always in control. Katie Archibald and Neah Evans of Great Britain kept them honest early on, but they were eventually overhauled by Clara Copponi and Marie Le Net of France – and, by the final sprint were just nine points ahead of Letizia Paternoster and Rachele Barbieri of Italy.

The Italians knew exactly what they needed to do – they had to win the final sprint and hope Great Britain failed to score. They did win the sprint. The Netherlands took second. France took third. And Great Britain took fourth – taking the Bronze medal by a single point.  

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

GOLD Netherlands NED (PIETERS Amy, WILD Kirsten) 35
SILVER France FRA (COPPONI Clara, le NET Marie) 30
BRONZE Great Britain GBR (ARCHIBALD Katie, EVANS Neah) 24

4 Italy ITA (PATERNOSTER Letizia, BARBIERI Rachele) 23
5 Denmark DEN (DIDERIKSEN Amalie, LETH Julie) 11
6 Australia AUS (BAKER Georgia, MANLY Alexandra) 5
7 Russian Cycling Federation RCF (NOVOLODSKAIA Mariia, MILIAEVA Mariia) -6
8 Belgium BEL (BOSSUYT Shari, de CLERCQ Katrijn) -19
9 New Zealand NZL (WOLLASTON Ally, DRUMMOND Michaela) -20
10 Germany GER (TEUTENBERG Lea Lin, REISSNER Lena Charlotte) -40
11 Switzerland SUI (ANDRES Michelle, METTRAUX Lena) -40
Poland POL (PIKULIK Daria, PIKULIK Wiktoria) DNF
Belarus BLR (TSERAKH Hanna, KIPTSIKAVA Nastassia) DNF
Ukraine UKR (FEDOTOVA Kseniia, KLIMCHENKO Tetyana) DNF
Spain ESP (LARRARTE ARTEAGA Eukene, ISASI CRISTOBAL Ziortza) DNF

Men’s Sprint

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

There were few surprises in Sprint qualifying, but with only four drivers given a bye to the 1/8 finals, there was a huge advantage to the drivers who got the extra 90 minutes recovery time.

Harrie Lavreysen of the Netherlands, Nicholas Paul of Trinidad and Tobago, Mikhail Iakovlev of Russia and Sebastien Vigier of France got that advantage; Lavreysen’s teammate and great rival Jeffrey Hoogland didn’t.

It was a fast session, though – the top 20 were all under 10 seconds and Lavreysen and Paul were separated by three thousandths of a second – Lavreysen the quicker on 9.418 seconds.

200m Time Trial

1 LAVREYSEN Harrie NED 9.418
2 PAUL Nicholas TTO 9.421
3 IAKOVLEV Mikhail RCF 9.499
4 VIGIER Sebastien FRA 9.583

5 RUDYK Mateusz POL 9.641
6 HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED 9.666
7 BOETTICHER Stefan GER 9.686
8 TJON EN FA Jair SUR 9.707
9 HELAL Rayan FRA 9.723
10 ROCHNA Daniel POL 9.788
11 SAHROM Muhammad Shah Firdaus MAS 9.800
12 WAMMES Nick CAN 9.808
13 HOEHNE Anton GER 9.834
14 YAMASAKI Kento JPN 9.835
15 TRUMAN Joseph GBR 9.836
16 SZALONTAY Sandor HUN 9.858
17 TURNBULL Hamish GBR 9.931
18 YAKUSHEVSKIY Pavel RCF 9.957
19 TERASAKI Kohei JPN 9.979
20 QUINTERO CHAVARRO Kevin Santiago COL 9.982
21 PERALTA Juan ESP 10.004
22 CECHMAN Martin CZE 10.029
23 ANGSUTHASAWIT Jai THA 10.060
24 LENDEL Vasilijus LTU 10.139
25 OCHOA HENAO Juan David COL 10.201
26 VERDUGO OSUNA Edgar Ismael MEX 10.322
27 SZABO Norbert ROU 10.375
28 RUIZ TERAN Juan Carlos MEX 10.406

29 SPARROW Mitchell RSA 10.485
30 MOHAMED YUSOFF Mohamed Elyas SIN 10.697

1/16 Finals

There were 12 heats in the 1/16 finals and in all but one, the faster qualifier went through. That meant that Hoogland, Mateusz Rudyk of Poland and Stefan Boetticher, among others, went straight through.

The one exception was the final heat – the two riders closest together on the timesheets – Sandor Szalontay of Hungary and Hamish Turnbull of Great Britain. They were two hundredths apart in Qualifying – in the Hungarians favour, but it was the Briton who progressed.

Heat 1
1 RUDYK Mateusz POL Winner
2 RUIZ TERAN Juan Carlos MEX +0.109

Heat 2
1 HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED Winner
2 SZABO Norbert ROU +0.084

Heat 3
1 BOETTICHER Stefan GER Winner
2 VERDUGO OSUNA Edgar Ismael MEX +0.142

Heat 4
1 TJON EN FA Jair SUR Winner
2 OCHOA HENAO Juan David COL +0.202

Heat 5
1 HELAL Rayan FRA Winner
2 LENDEL Vasilijus LTU +0.238

Heat 6
1 ROCHNA Daniel POL Winner
2 ANGSUTHASAWIT Jai THA +0.045

Heat 7
1 SAHROM Muhammad Shah Firdaus MAS Winner
2 CECHMAN Martin CZE +1.160

Heat 8
1 WAMMES Nick CAN Winner
2 PERALTA Juan ESP +0.161

Heat 9
1 HOEHNE Anton GER Winner
2 QUINTERO CHAVARRO Kevin Santiago COL +0.060

Heat 10
1 YAMASAKI Kento JPN Winner
2 TERASAKI Kohei JPN +0.047

Heat 11
1 TRUMAN Joseph GBR Winner2 YAKUSHEVSKIY Pavel RCF +0.057

Heat 12
1 TURNBULL Hamish GBR Winner
2 SZALONTAY Sandor HUN +0.072

1/8 Finals

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Turnbull’s reward for overcoming his seeding was to be paired with Lavreysen in the 1/8 Finals and this time the result went to form. Indeed, once more every heat reflected the riders’ relative qualifying performance until the last one, when Rayan Helal of France who qualified 9th beat Jair Tjon En Fa of Suriname who qualified 8th. So, after two rounds of match sprinting we are left with the top seven riders – and the ninth. You sometimes wonder why we bother.

Heat 1
1 LAVREYSEN Harrie NED Winner
2 TURNBULL Hamish GBR +0.951

Heat 2
1 PAUL Nicholas TTO Winner
2 TRUMAN Joseph GBR +0.595

Heat 3
1 IAKOVLEV Mikhail RCF Winner
2 YAMASAKI Kento JPN +0.021

Heat 4
1 VIGIER Sebastien FRA Winner
2 HOEHNE Anton GER +0.222

Heat 5
1 RUDYK Mateusz POL Winner
2 WAMMES Nick CAN +0.059

Heat 6
1 HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED Winner
2 SAHROM Muhammad Shah Firdaus MAS +0.105

Heat 7
1 BOETTICHER Stefan GER Winner
2 ROCHNA Daniel POL +0.921

Heat 8
1 HELAL Rayan FRA Winner
2 TJON EN FA Jair SUR +0.114

Quarter Finals

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

 At last, things got mixed up a bit. Lavreysen and Vigier progressed without a real challenge, but while Paul and Iakovlev both went one up. First Paul, then Iakovlev found themselves facing a decider after Boetticher outdragged the Trini rider and Hoogland held the Russian side-by-side for a lap and a half before edging ahead. More surprisingly, given Paul and Iakovlev’s raw speed, they had exactly the same thing done to them in the third race.

Heat 1
1 LAVREYSEN Harrie NED **
2 HELAL Rayan FRA +0.112 +1.482

Heat 2
1 BOETTICHER Stefan GER +0.772 **
2 PAUL Nicholas TTO * +0.009 +0.037

Heat 3
1 HOOGLAND Jeffrey NED +0.001 **
2 IAKOVLEV Mikhail RCF * +0.155 +0.346

Heat 4
1 VIGIER Sebastien FRA **
2 RUDYK Mateusz POL +0.101 +0.852

Women’s Individual Pursuit

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

Given the dominance of the German Team Pursuit squad – and the fact that only Italy came close, it wasn’t really a surprise to see the fastest three times in Qualifying go to German riders – Lisa Brennauer, Franziska Brausse and Mieke Kroeger – and the fourth to Martina Alzini of Italy. What didn’t bode well for the spectacle in the finale was that Brennauer’s time of 3:17.572 was almost five seconds faster than Brausse – and Kroeger was four seconds clear of Alzini.

Qualifying

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

1 BRENNAUER Lisa GER 3:17.572
2 BRAUSSE Franziska GER 3:22.292

3 KROEGER Mieke GER 3:22.336
4 ALZINI Martina ITA 3:26.328

5 BORRAS Marion FRA 3:26.856
6 MURPHY Kelly IRL 3:27.490
7 WILLIAMS Lily USA 3:30.386
8 GRIFFIN Mia IRL 3:34.713
9 BARKER Megan GBR 3:35.175
10 BARNWELL Ella GBR 3:35.539
11 BURI Fabienne SUI 3:35.889
12 SALAUYEVA Aksana BLR 3:36.744
13 YAROSHENKO Viktoriia UKR 3:37.134
14 CALVO BARBERO Tania ESP 3:38.003
15 HERNANDEZ GOMEZ Lina Marcela COL 3:40.261
16 PARRA ROJAS Jessica Marcela COL 3:41.837
17 LUO Yiwei SIN 3:44.992
18 UKPESERAYE Ese NGR 4:14.774

Finals

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

As expected, the finals were a convincing display of technical pursuiting, but lacking a bit in tension, let alone drama. Kroeger caught Alzini and carried on to try to demonstrate she should have been in the final. And, indeed, here time was a couple of seconds quicker than Brausse’s for the Silver, but still four seconds adrift of Brennauer’s winning time.

Photo - Rob Jones/Canadian Cyclist

GOLD BRENNAUER Lisa GER 3:18.258
SILVER BRAUSSE Franziska GER 3:22.980

BRONZE KROEGER Mieke GER 3:20.903
4 ALZINI Martina ITA Overhauled

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