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UCI Track Cycling World Cup III – Cali – Day 2; Session 2

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Women’s Team Sprint – Finals

The first event of the second session of the day – which started barely minutes after the close of the first session – was the finals of the team sprint competition. The Russian duo of Daria Schmeleva and Ekaterina Gnidenko were set to contest the gold against the Dutch pairing of Elis Ligtlee and Shanne Braspennincx. The bronze match had Spaniards Tania Calvo Barbero and Helena Casas Roige pitted against Katie Schofield and Natasha Hansen from New Zealand. The British pairing of Katy Marchant and Jessica Varnish had heartbreakingly lost out on qualifying for the finals by just two hundredths of a second.

The match for bronze was first off, and Spain were the favourites on paper finished ahead of New Zealand in the two preceeding rounds as well as boasting a faster qualifying time. In the end, a fast opening lap by Barbero (18.95s) was enough to put Spain in the lead from the offset, and the pair crossed the line in 33.356, a clear 0.7 seconds ahead of their Antipodean competition (34.028 seconds).

Russia had consistently finished in silver medal position in the two preceding rounds of the World Cup and this match represented their best chance to collect the gold. Despite Ligtlee’s individual sprinting talent, the pair had not so far managed to translate this into the same success in the team event. Schmeleva, who had won triple gold in the time trial, Keirin and sprint at the 2012 junior world championships, opened with a fast 18.661 opening lap against a fairly steady 19.022 from Ligtlee. Gnidenko increased Russia’s advantage in the second lap, and the pair crossed the line in 32.982 against the Dutch mark of 33.586. Russia took their first gold of the World Cup series and, with it, the win in the World Cup series.

Women’s Team Sprint – Finals – Results

Final for Gold

Gold RUSSIA (Daria Schmeleva, Ekaterina Gnidenko) 32.982
Silver NETHERLANDS (Elis Ligtlee, Shanne Braspennincx) 33.586

Final for Bronze

Bronze SPAIN (Tania Calvo Barbero, Helena Casas Roige) 33.356
4 NEW ZEALAND (Katie Schofield, Natasha Hansen) 34.028

Women’s Team Pursuit – Finals

Unlike the team sprint, the team pursuit had a two additional finals for 7th to 8th and 5th to 6th positions. The first match saw New Zealand pitted against Hong Kong. New Zealand had been the slowest team in the first round, whilst Hong Kong had qualified for one of the gold medal qualifying heats so were undoubtedly the favourites. The event went to form: although New Zealand had a faster opening lap, the Hong Kong quartet consistently took time out of the Kiwis on each lap, eventually catching the team in the final lap to take seventh place.

The match for 5th and 6th was a painstakingly close affair: Belarus found themselves ahead for the first three kilometres, but paid for the early enthusiasm: the ordered German quartet held their speed well to the line, taking 2.5 seconds out of the Belarussians in the final kilometre to take fifth place in 4:35.423 against the Belarussians’ 4:37.992.

The bronze medal ride-off saw the Italian team – who had been second fastest in qualifying – face the United States who had put in a storming ride of 4:29 in the first round to qualify for the finals second fastest. The Americans were able to consolidate their first round performance with an excellent display of team pursuiting in the final round, the Italians paying for an overenthusiastic start. The US-team, who only dropped to a 17 second lap in the final lap, took the bronze medal in 4:32.482 against the Italians’ 4:35.776.

Italy got the consolation of qualifying for the final by posting the fourth fastest qualifying time whilst a much improved United States team who were in the unenviable position of starting first took the second spot in the bronze medal final with a fast time of 4:29.904 – eleven seconds faster than their qualifying time the previous evening.

The gold medal final saw the Chinese team take the advantage for the first three kilometres, holding a consistent half second advantage. However, the experience of the young Australian team, three of whom were reigning junior champions in the discipline, saw them claw back the lead in the final kilometre with China fading badly after losing their fourth rider, Di Jin. The Australians took the title in 4:31.527 against the Chinese time of 4:34.105.

The absence of the Great Britain team, who had won the previous two rounds, meant the Australians took the win in the World Cup competition and, in doing so, set a warning to the world that their development team is already in shape to take on the best in the world.

Women’s Team Pursuit – Finals – Results

Final for Gold

Gold AUSTRALIA (Macey STEWART, Elissa WUNDERSITZ, Alexandra MANLY, Lauren PERRY) 4:31.527
Silver CHINA (Dong Yan HUANG, Di JIN, Hongyu LIANG, Zhao BAOFANG) 4:34.105

Final for Bronze

Bronze UNITED STATES (Carmen SMALL, Lauren TAMAYO, Jennifer VALENTE, Ruth WINDER) 4:32.482
4 ITALY (FRAPPORTI Simona, Beatrice BARTELLONI, Tatiana GUDERZO, Silva VALSECCHI) 4:35.776

5 GERMANY 4:35.423
6 BELARUS 4:37.992
7 HONG KONG 4:32.293
8 NEW ZEALAND

Women’s Individual Sprint – Final for 5th to 8th Places

Two of the four riders in the minor final were British: Victoria Williamson and Jessica Varnish. With the talented Cuban rider, Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez, relegated due to entering her opponents’ line, it was reigning Azerbaijan national champion, Olga Ismayilova, who took the win to claim fifth place, with Williamson triumphing against her teammate for second place.

Women’s Individual Sprint – Final for 5th to 8th Places – Results

5 Olga ISMAYILOVA  AZERBAIJAN
6 Victoria WILLIAMSON  GREAT BRITAIN
7 Jessica VARNISH  GREAT BRITAIN
8 Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA (REL)

Women’s Individual Sprint – Semi-Finals

Just two rounds were needed in both semifinals to secure qualification to the gold medal final for Elis Ligtlee of the Netherlands and Shuang Guo of Max Success Pro Cycling. With just seven points separating the pair in the World Cup standings, the final would undoubtedly be an exciting race.

Women’s Individual Sprint – Semi Finals – Heat Winners Progressing to Finals

1 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
2 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING

Women’s Individual Sprint – Finals

Just two rounds were needed to decide both the gold and bronze medal finals: a delighted Ligtlee triumphed against Guo in both rounds, Wai Sze Lee was able to claim bronze in both races despite a hard fought battle by Sandie Clair of France.

Ligtlee’s victory was enough to propel into the gold medal spot in the World Cup overall competition, finishing with 383 points against Guo’s 375. Lee took the bronze medal in the overall competition.

Women’s Individual Sprint – Finals – Results

For Gold

Gold Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS
Silver Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING

For Bronze

Bronze Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG
4 Sandie CLAIR  FRANCE

Women’s Omnium III – Elimination Race

A serious crash at the back of the race in the early stages took many riders out, including Ireland’s Caroline Ryan. The race was immediately neutralised and, with all riders back on their bikes, was ultimately restarted. The Mexican rider who had an outside chance of claiming the World Cup omnium title was the fourth rider to be eliminated whilst Balabolina, who had shone in the individual pursuit the previous evening, was also out halfway through the race.

The final three riders left in the race were competition leaders, Kirsten Wild and Simona Frapporti, together with Soline Lamboley of France who had yet to feature prominently in the competition so far. The silver medallist in the 2013 world championships and four-time French champion, powered ahe
ad of her competition in the final straight to take the win, with Wild having to settle for second place and Frapporti third.

Women’s Omnium III – Elimination Race Results

1 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS
2 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY
3 Soline LAMBOLEY  FRANCE
4 Katarzyna PAWLOWSKA
5 Lotte KOPECKY BELGIUM
6 Amalie DIDERIKSEN  DENMARK
7 Anna KNAUER  GERMANY
8 Racquel SHEATH  NETHERLANDS
9 Ausrine TREBAITE  LITHUANIA
10 Leire OLABERRIA DORRONSORO  SPAIN

Men’s Team Sprint – Finals

The bronze medal ride was the first of the finals to be held which saw the Polish team of Grzegorz Drejgier, Damian Zielinski and Krzysztof Maksel line up against the Japanese trio of Kazuki Amagai, Kazunari Watanbe and Seiichiro Nakagawa. The Polish team were riding a new team formation  in the Cali round of the world cup and the new formation paid off with the trio crossing the line in 43.907 with Maksel’s final lap of 13.341 ultimately ending up as faster than any of those in the gold medal match.

With Francois Pervis absent from the French trio in the gold medal final due to the morning’s crash in the keirin race, Kevin Sireau had the tall order of filling Pervis’ shoes. The Dutch team had already got the advantage going into the race, the team of Jeffrey Hoogland, Hugo Haak and Matthijs Buchi clocking the fastest time in qualifying. Both teams were started perfectly by Bauge and Hoogland, but it was Pervis’ replacement, Sireau, who managed to claw a third of a second into the Dutch in the second lap, who was ultimately responsible for the team taking the gold medal. The French crossed the line in 43.634 against the Dutch time of 43.816.

Men’s Team Sprint – Finals – Results

Final for Gold

Gold France (Gregory BAUGE, Kevin SIREAU, Quentin LAFARGUE) 43.634
Silver NETHERLANDS (Jeffrey HOOGLAND, Hugo haak, Matthijs BUCHLI) 44.090

Final for Bronze

Bronze Poland (Grzegorz DREJGIER, Damian ZIELINSKI, Krzysztof MAKSEL) 43.907
4 JAPAN (Kazuki AMAGAI, Kazunari WATANABI, Seiichiro NAKAGAWA) 44.975

Men’s Team Pursuit – Finals

Russia were piitted against Belgium for the first final for seventh place, and it was the Russians who immediately appeared to take command of the race and, with 500m remaining had a near two second advantage. However, the Russian team fell apart in the final 500m, their 16.718s penultimate lap allowing the Belgians to get ahead. A 15 second lap was enough to cement the win in the final lap, with the Belgians crossing the line in 4:09.221 against the Russians’ 4:09.418.

The final for fifth place saw Germany lined up against Spain. Germany had performed particularly well in the qualifying heats, and narrowly missed qualifying for the gold medal final. Despite a credible fight for the first 3000m, Spain eventually succumbed to the might of the experienced German squad who crossed the line in 4:05.307 against the Spaniards 4:07.455.

The final for gold had the potential to be the closest final of the four, with the Danish team who had been painstakingly close to reaching the gold medal final pitted against the British development squad team who had posted the second fastest time behind Rusvelo in the previous round. It was the Danes who had the advantage for the first 3000m, although, as predicted, were unable to power away to anything more than a 0.6 second advantage. A 14 second lap at 3000m propelled the British quartet into the lead, and they were able to increase their advantage right through to the line, eventually finishing in 4:05.391 against the Danes’ 4:05.826.

The gold medal final was another closely fought affair, with the trade team Rusvelo competing against a young Australian squad. The match was difficult to call throughout, with the Australians marginally ahead for the first 3000m. However, a slight lapse in formation was enough to give the Russian team the advantage. However, the Russians’ burst of speed cost them dearly and they faded badly in the final kilometre to allow an ecstatic Australian team to cross the line first in 4:03.200 against Rusvelo’s time of 4:04.229.

However, Great Britain’s bronze medal was enough to allow them to win the overall World Cup competition, finishing just 30 points ahead of the Australians. Denmark took third place.

Men’s Team Pursuit – Finals – Results

Final for Gold

Gold AUSTRALIA (Scott LAW, Joshua HARRISON, Jackson LAW, Tirian MCMANUS) 4:03.200
Silver RUSVELO (Artur ERSHOV, Alexander EVTUSHENKO, Alexey KURBATOV, Alexander SEROV) 4:04.229

Final for Bronze

Bronze GREAT BRITAIN (Germain BURTON, Matthew GIBSON, Christopher LATHAM, Mark STEWART) 4:05.931
4 DENMARK (Daniel HARTVIG, Anders HOLM, Rasmus Christian QUAADE, Casper VAN FOLSACH) 4:05.826

Remaining teams in time order:

5 GERMANY 4:05.307
6 SPAIN 4:07.455
7 BELGIUM 4:09.221
8 RUSSIA 4:09.418

Men’s Omnium III – Elimination Race

The last event of the night, which was now running severely late, was the elimination event in the men’s omnium event. Tim Veldt of the Netherlands, the current leader in the Cali competition, was taken out early on in the event and, despite getting back into the field, was unable to sustain the pace and ended up being the eighth rider to be eliminated. One of Veldt’s major competitors, also exited with 10 riders still remaining but it was now Maximilian Beyer of Germany who posed the biggest threat to Veldt’s lead.

Casper Pedersen of Denmark was the fifth last rider to be eliminated, whilst Oliver Wood of Great Britain put in an excellent ride to finish in fourth. The loud Colombian support was not enough to stop the Colombian Sebastian Molano being eliminated third from last.

The final lap was to be contested by Thomas Boudat and Beyer. An excellent final lap by Beyer saw him take the victory – and the overall lead in the competition overnight.

Men’s Omnium III – Elimination Race Results

1 Maximilian BEYER  GERMANY
2 Thomas BOUDAT  FRANCE
3 Sebastian MOLANO  COLOMBIA
4 Oliver WOOD  GREAT BRITAIN
5 Casper PEDERSEN  DENMARK
6 Gael SUTER  SWITZERLAND
7 Viktor MANAKOV  RUSSIA
8 Ondrej RYBIN  CZECH REPUBLIC
9 Hao LIU  CHINA
10 Jasper DE BUYST BELGIUM

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