There were medals galore in the second session of Day 2 of the World Cup in Guadalajara with the Men’s and Women’s Team Sprints and Team Pursuits decided – as well as the Women’s Sprint and the Men’s Keirin. And both Omniums continued with incident filled Elimination races.

Women’s Team Sprint

Despite the first session of the day running seriously overtime, for which the derny driver should take at least part of the blame, riders were still given an hour’s break between sessions.

First race of the second session was the finals of the women’s team sprint. Sadly for the Germans, Miriam Welte had been taken ill with a bad bout of food poisoning – which was all too evident in Welte’s performance in the sprint competition earlier in the day – and the German pair were unable to start in the gold medal final.

The bronze medal competition was first, with Russia pitted against the Netherlands. Both teams contained riders who had just qualified for the sprint final competition – Anastasiia Voinova (RUS) and Elis Ligtlee (NED) demonstrating the difficulties of running the omnium competition in parallel with the other events. The Netherlands found themselves down after the first lap and were unable to turn the result round in the second lap, resulting in the Russians being awarding the gold medal with a time of 32.585 against the Netherlands’ 33.164.

The first gold medal of the championships was awarded by default to the Australians after Germany’s withdrawal.

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Women’s Team Sprint Finals

GOLD Australia (Kaarle MCCULLOCH, Stephanie MORTON)
SILVER Germany (Kristina VOGEL, Miriam WELTE) DNS
BRONZE Russia (Daria SHMELEVA, Anastasia VOINOVA) 32.585
4 Netherlands (Shanne BRASPENNINCX, Elis LIGTLEE) 33.164

5 Spain 33.100
6 France 33.453
7 New Zealand 33.469
8 Colombia 33.948
9 Great Britain 34.023
10 Mexico 34.211
11 Ukraine 34.377
12 Poland 34.431
13 Japan Professional Cyclist Association 34.499
14 Canada 34.550
15 Korea 34.799
16 United States 35.187
17 Hong Kong 36.331
18 Finland 37.058
19 India 37.520
Lithuania REL
Venezuela REL
China REL

Women’s Team Pursuit

The team pursuit finals followed the team sprint. Germany withdrew from the final for 7th and 8th place, so Italy took seventh place by default. Australia were next up, competing against Cuba for 5th/6th place. A strong ride by the Australians saw the quartet catch the Cubans with 1.5 laps remaining to take fifth place.

In the bronze medal ride, the Chinese put in their best performance of the competition so far, riding at excellent time of 4:23.911 to snatch the bronze with New Zealand only able to put down a time of 4:25.146 in defence. The Chinese have improved significantly in every round of the team pursuit showing they would be a real force to be reckoned with if they could crack their formula in the qualifying heats.

The gold medal ride saw the dominant British squad of Laura Trott, Elinor Barker, Ciara Horne and Amy Roberts compete against the Canadians. Fatigue got the better of the Canadians after three kilometres and, with the British squad only slowing marginally in the final kilometre, Great Britain took the gold medal and only needed to produce their slowest ride of the competition to claim it (4:21.256). Canada finished in 4:26.122.

Heartbreakingly for Horne, she was unable to attend the medal ceremony due to fainting shortly before the ceremony was due to start.

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Women’s Team Pursuit Finals

GOLD Great Britain (Laura TROTT, Elinor BARKER, Ciara HORNE, Amy ROBERTS) 4:21.256
SILVER Canada (Allison BEVERIDGE, Jasmin GLAESSER, Kirsti LAY, Stephanie ROORDA) 4:26.122
BRONZE China (Dong Yan HUANG, Yali JING, Jiang WENWEN, Baofang ZHAO) 4:23.911
4 New Zealand (Rushlee BUCHANAN, Lauren ELLIS, Jaime NIELSEN, Georgia WILLIAMS) 4:25.146

5 Australia 3:20.727 (for 3km; caught Cuba)
6 Cuba 3:27.379 (for 3km; caught by Australia)
7 Italy
8 Germany DNS

9 United States 4:32.069
10 Russia 4:34.613
11 Belarus 4:35.868
12 France 4:36.072
13 Mexico 4:36.820
14 Poland 4:37.058
15 Belgium 4:37.152
16 Japan 4:38.348
17 Ireland 4:39.462
18 Spain 4:40.521
19 Hong Kong 4:45.587
20 Ukraine 4:51.461

Women’s Sprint

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The first event in the evening’s proceedings was the ride for 5th-8th place which Anna Meares (Jayco) took from Tania Calvo Barbero on the line.

Women’s Sprint 5th-8th place

5 Anna MEARES  JAYCO
6 Tania CALVO BARBERO  SPAIN +0.030
7 Wai Sze LEE  HONG KONG +0.058
8 Tianshi ZHONG  CHINA 361o CYCLING TEAM +0.336

The semi-finals followed – and were contested in an identical fashion to the quarter finals, with both pairings only having to contest two matches to progress to the final. Shuang Guo (Max Success Pro Cycling) convincingly won both her semi-final matches against Elis Ligtlee (Netherlands). 20-year old Ligtlee had looked the strongest throughout the competition, so the result came as a surprise to some.

Clearly unphased from having to compete the team sprint at the beginning of the session, the second semi-final saw Voinova take the first match by just a hundredth of a second. Her win in the second race was more convincing, sealing her a place in the final.

Semi-Final – Winners who qualify for final

1 Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING
2 Anastasiia VOINOVA  RUSSIA

The ride for bronze putted a tiring Ligtlee against Lisandra Guerra Rodriguez of Cuba. Guerra Rodriguez took both the first two races – albeit marginally – to take the gold medal.

A late relegation in the first gold medal race saw Guo take the first race. However, Voinova’s riding improved in the final two races which saw her take the final two races and claim the gold – and her delight was palpable.

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Finals

GOLD Anastasiia VOINOVA  RUSSIA
SILVER Shuang GUO  MAX SUCCESS PRO CYCLING
BRONZE Lisandra GUERRA RODRIGUEZ  CUBA
4 Elis LIGTLEE  NETHERLANDS

Women’s Omnium

The third event in the women’s omnium was the elimination race and, such was the tension before the start, there was a crash in the neutralised period before the race had started. Once the race was underway, Jolien D’Hoore (BEL) crashed early on, but was able to continue in the race.

The home nation were first to be eliminated, with favourite Sarah Hammer (USA) lasting only four elimination rounds before having to leave the track. Britain’s Katie Archibald got through to the final 10, with New Zealand being eliminated a further three laps later. The earlier faller, D’Hoore, was the last rider to be eliminated before the final lap which saw Russia pitted against Denmark in the sprint. Evgeniya Romanyuta showed why she has Track World Cup overall omnium wins to her name in 2012 and 2013 by taking Amalie Dideriksen in the final sprint for the line.

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Women’s Omnium III – Elimination

1 Evgeniya Romanyuta  RUSSIA
2 Amalie Dideriksen  DENMARK
3 Kirsten WILD  NETHERLANDS
4 Jolien D’HOORE  BELGIUM
5 Malgorzata WOJTYRA  POLAND
6 Marlies MEJIAS GARCIA  CUBA
7 Raquel SHEATH  NEW ZEALAND
8 Lucie ZALESKA  CZECH REPUBLIC
9 Simona FRAPPORTI  ITALY
10 Katie ARCHIBALD  GREAT BRITAIN

Men’s Team Sprint

The bronze medal final took place first, with New Zealand facing the Dutch in the final. The favoured New Zealand team, consisting of Ethan Mitchell, Sam Webster and Edward Dawkins, took the bronze in the fastest ride in both finals (42.769). Netherlands finished a third of a second adrift in 42.098.

The race for the gold was a much closer affair, with both Great Britain and Germany fielding exceptionally strong teams. The race was forced into a restart after Robert Forstemann fell before reaching the first corner. Once the race was underway, the Germans, consisting of Forstemann, Joachim Eilers and Eric Engler, were up after the first two laps, but a faster closing lap saw the British steal the gold by just a hundredth of a second.

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GOLD Great Britain (Philip HINDES, Jason KENNY, Callum Crichton SKINNER) 43.092
SILVER Germany (Stefan BOTTICHER, Joachim EILERS, Robert FORSTEMANN) 43.106
BRONZE New Zealand (Ethan MITCHELL, Sam WEBSTER, Edward DAWKINS) 42.769
4 Netherlands (Matthijs BUCHLI, Hugo HAAK, Nils VAN’T HOENDERAAL) 43.098

5 Australia 43.042
6 France 43.169
7 Venezuela 43.497
8 Colombia 43.531
9 Korea 43.801
10 Poland 43.923
11 Japan 43.922

12 Russia 43.969
13 Brazil 44.232
14 China 44.316
15 Minsk Cycling Club 44.438
16 Canada 44.613
17 Spain 44.624
18 Argentina 44.709
19 Japan Professional Cyclist Association 44.737
20 Greece 44.832
21 United States 44.964
22 Trinidad & Tobago 45.105
23 Mexico 45.531
24 India 48.932

Men’s Team Pursuit

The men’s team pursuit started with the ride for 7th/8th place. The Netherlands once again had a shaky start; so shaky, in fact, the team were down to three riders after just seven laps and were caught with kilometre to go.

The final for 5th/6th place was a more ordered – and much closer – affair between New Zealand and Denmark. Denmark had the faster start and were able to maintain their lead for 3000m when they had a third of a second advantage on the Kiwis. However, the measured start paid dividends for the Kiwis who, with a closing kilometre half a second faster than the tiring Danes, won the match to take fifth place in 3:58.844 against the Danes’ 3:58.951.

The ride for bronze proved to be equally as close. The Swiss quartet found themselves ahead after two kilometres, and the two teams remained uniformly close to each other throughout the event. In the end, it was the Germans who took victory by just four-hundredths of a second in 3:57.828 to the Swiss’ 3:57.867.

The ride for gold pitted an on-form Australian squad of Daniel Fitter, Alexander Porter, Miles Scotson and Samuel Welsford against the British quartet of Jonathan Dibben, Steven Burke, Andrew Tennant and Mark Christian. The British quartet had the fastest first kilometre, but a strong second kilometre by the Australians – over half a second quicker than the British – was enough to put them ahead. They were able to increase their lead further in the third kilometre, which led to the British only being able to muster a 59.509 final kilometre – the slowest of the medal final competition. The Australians took the gold in a fast 3:55.976 with the British having to settle for silver in 3:58.129.

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Men’s Team Pursuit Finals

GOLD Australia (Daniel FITTER, Alexander PORTER, Miles SCOTSON, Samuel WELFORD) 3:55.976
SILVER Great Britain (Jonathan DIBBEN, Steven BURKE, Andrew TENNANT, Mark CHRISTIAN) 3:58.129
BRONZE Germany (Henning BOMMEL, Theo REINHARDT, Leon ROHDE, Kersten THIELE) 3:57.828
4 Switzerland (Silvan DILLIER, Stefan KUENG, Frank PASCHE, Thery SCHIR) 3:57.867

5 New Zealand 3:58.844
6 Denmark 3:58.951
7 Spain 3:00.754 (for 3km, caught Netherlands)
8 Netherlands 2:04.676 (for 2km, caught by Spain)
9 Colombia 4:02.294
10 Belarus 4:03.022
11 Italy 4:03.183
12 Russia 4:03.560
13 China 4:03.595
14 Belgium 4:04.537
15 Argentina 4:05.454
16 Canada 4:05.503
17 Japan 4:06.068
18 Venezuela 4:07.761
19 Ukraine 4:07.925
20 Kazakhstan 4:08.625
21 Hong Kong 4:09.696
22 Chile 4:09.709
23 Ireland 4:11.618
24 Mexico 4:16.376

Men’s Keirin

The first final saw six riders compete for 7-12 place in the first race. The race started – and was soon aborted after Flavio Cipriano of Brazil overlapped the derny. Whilst it could not be fully blamed on the derny rider this time, he was notably late to pull off which could have been the reason for Cipriano’s misjudgement. Cipriano was disqualified and the race restarted. Matthijs Buchli (NED) took the win, ahead of Hugo Barrette of Canada and Sergiy Omelchenko of Azerbaijan.

In the final for the first three places, Eilers Joachim (GER) was rewarded for riding the perfect race to claim the win on the line, just two-thousands of a second clear of Matthew Glaetzer (AUS). Fabian Hernando Puerta Zaptata (COL) took bronze, five-hundredths of a second clear of Jason Kenny (GBR).

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Keirin Finals

For 1-6

GOLD Joachim EILERS  GERMANY
SILVER Matthew Glaetzer  AUSTRALIA +0.002
BRONZE Fabian Hernando Puerta Zaptata  COLOMBIA +0.088
4 Jason KENNY  GREAT BRITAIN
5 Nikita SHURSHIN  RUSSIA +0.142
3 Kamil Kuczynski  POLAND +0.600

For 7-12

7 Matthijs BUCHLI  NETHERLANDS
8 Hugo BARRETTE  CANADA +0.083
9 Sergiy OMELCHENKO  AZERBAIJAN +0.127
10 Pavel KELEMAN  CZECH REPUBLIC +0.370
11 Flavio CIPRIANO  BRAZIL DSQ
12 Denis DMITRIEV  RUSVELO DNS

Men’s Omnium

The final race of the evening was the men’s omnium elimination race. Great Britain’s Jonathan Dibben was only the second rider to be eliminated, perhaps still recovering from the team pursuit final just minutes earlier. The race started to become tactical with seven laps remaining, and first to lose out after these tactics started was pursuit sensation, Bobby Lea (USA). Lucas Liss (GER) was the last rider to be eliminated before the final lap which was contested by Italy’s Elia Viviani and Australia’s Glenn O’Shea. Viviani had been looking dangerously strong throughout the race, and was therefore of little surprise that he took the race from O’Shea, putting his crash from the omnium event far behind him.

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Men’s Omnium III – Elimination Race

1 Elia VIVANI  ITALY
2 Glen O’SHEA  AUSTRALIA
3 Lucas LISS  GERMANY
4 Raman TSISHKOU  BELARUS
5 Unai ELORRIAGA ZUBIAUR  SPAIN
6 Bobby LEA  UNITED STATES

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